Cranfield School of Management in the news: January 2009

Cranfield School of Management

Visit Cranfield School of Management's main website
 
Forum Newsletter Header

Cranfield in the News:January 2009

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2009

2008

For a full list of all Cranfield School of Management cuttings from see the searchable database

Financial Times
Angels` wings help with take-off   (28-January-2009)

Profile of Dr. Andrew Rickman OBE, (Executive MBA, 1992). Co-founder of Rockley Ventures the private technology investment company.

Further information...


Financial Times
Perhaps schools are partly to blame?   (26-January-2009)

Professor Michael Osbaldeston is quoted in the Global MBA Rankings supplement, commenting on the accusation that business schools will be blamed for some of the excesses that have recently been observed and for some of the mistakes made by business leaders.

Further information...


The Independent
Weathering the storm   (22-January-2009)

Students who started their MBAs this week can give themselves a pat on the back. At least they are out there and proving their skills at a time when the global economy is getting worse by the day. Thousands of others will be thinking of applying for similar courses later this year ? perhaps a business Masters, or simply some executive education designed to improve their chances when skies start to look brighter.Applications are up ? but Professor Michael Osbaldeston, head of school at Cranfield, has seen recessions before. "My experience is that business schools are what`s called a lagging indicator," he says, "which means that we are likely to suffer the consequences of a recession later rather than sooner. "It takes time for companies to turn off their executive education budgets, particularly when they have significantly invested in a customised partnership. The open programmes will suffer before the customised relationships."

Further information...


The Independent
Tailored to your needs   (22-January-2009)

The key to making what you want of an MBA are the electives on offer. Core courses provide students with a solid grounding in the common functions of any business. But beyond this schools offer specialised electives, which represent a chance for students to specialise in areas as diverse as sustainability, entrepreneurship, and mergers and acquisitions. Cranfield now offers thematic electives, with major modules such as entrepreneurship and minor modules in more traditional electives like mergers and acquisitions and international strategy. "We`re still covering a very wide range,? says S?an Rickard, director of the full-time MBA programme. "But now we`re doing it in a more controlled way." However electives are taught, no one doubts their importance. "Core courses provide an understanding of business functions," says Rickard. "Electives take that learning and apply it to the real world."

Further information...


The Independent
Doctorate of Business Administration   (22-January-2009)

It was the gap between medics` approach to life and death situations, and the behaviour of business managers that inspired Colin Gruar to take a DBA at Cranfield School of Management. He continued to work for The British Heart Foundation during the four years of his DBA, where he looked at how an organisation develops a brand that speaks to a large and complex community of stakeholders. With an MBA from Cranfield taken 20 years ago, he says he looked into doing a PhD but preferred the DBA for its practical application.

Further information...


The Independent
How to manage a crisis   (22-January-2009)

As both commercial companies and public bodies tighten their belts to weather the worsening economic tide, the focus is shifting away from thinking outside the box to making better use of what`s in it. This more pragmatic outlook has led to a growing demand for high-quality executive education designed to teach managers concepts such as resilience and sustainability (in the business, as well as environmental, sense), and help them re-imagine an old one: leadership. While leadership and resilience are flavours of the month, schools are also continuing to promote courses on sustainability. This is despite widespread predictions by some commentators that ? along with corporate social responsibility ? green practices would be an early casualty of the downturn. Dr Donna Ladkin, director of a new open-enrolment programme focusing on eco-friendly business at Cranfield School of Management, says: "As a survival strategy in this period, sustainability makes sense. If you use less power to light and heat your offices, you`ll save money."

Further information...


The Independent
Executive Education   (22-January-2009)

As executive education becomes more customised ? in substance, if not name ? so, too, is it increasingly being internationalised to meet the needs of overseas clients. "Ten years ago, people from around the world would come to us, but we`re seeing that far less today," says Dr David Butcher, director of Open Executive Programmes at Cranfield School of Management. "People want open-enrolment programmes, in particular, on their doorsteps: they don`t want to travel, for reasons of time and cost, and because there`s a growing awareness about environmental damage caused by flying. Our overseas clients also want programmes specific to their regions` cultures." With 60 customised and 40 open-enrolment courses, Cranfield boasts one of the biggest executive portfolios of any business school. Dr Butcher, whose foreign clients include Shell in Asia, sees no better illustration of Cranfield`s "regionalisation" than in its leadership training. "Some would say leadership is leadership, but our programmes recognise it needs to be adapted to different regions," he explains. "In Asia, there are different views of the world to those in America and Europe. There`s more emphasis on collective decision-making, but also greater deference to organisational structure."

Further information...


The Independent
The course gets managers together   (22-January-2009)

Claudine Lewis is experiencing first-hand the benefits of a more internationalised approach to executive education offers for multinational businesses. As global head of management training at Kuehne+Nagel ? which develops supply chain solutions for everything from major electronics manufacturers to aid agencies ? she oversees 54,000 employees, spread over 100 countries. This job has become significantly easier since the launch of a bespoke managerial programme through Cranfield School of Management. The nine-day course comprises two modules, covering strategic development and leadership. "These managers operate in different countries and cultures, but this gets them together in one room," explains Claudine, 41, who attends the programmes herself, and has so far commissioned four ? each delivered in a distinct region, including America and Asia. "For me, this was a great way to understand what managers in other countries go through, and it gave me snapshots of their individual capabilities."

Further information...


The Guardian
Qualified success   (17-January-2009)

Cranfield School of Management is just one of the postgraduate training providers exhibiting at the Guardian Postgraduate Study and Training Fair 2009 on 21st January at the Business Design Centre in Islington, London.

Further information...


Financial Times
Squeezing the lemon can be a fruitful exercise   (17-January-2009)

In these straitened times, it is more important than ever to get more out of your existing customers. However, understanding how to do this is not straightforward. Gerard Burke, who runs the Business Growth and Development Programme (BGP) at Cranfield, has coined the phrase ?squeezing the lemon? to explain where most entrepreneurs go wrong. His theory is based on the observation that lemons used in home cooking often end up only half used because the recipe only calls for the juice of half the fruit. The remainder is left in the fridge. Many business owners, he claims, act the same way with their customers, even in the good times.

Further information...


The Daily Telegraph
Business schools wake up to their new reality   (15-January-2009)

Business schools are coping with the recession and the financial crisis ? so far. Professor Michael Osbaldeston, soon to retire as director of Cranfield School of Management and immediate past president of the Association of Business Schools, says: ?Management education was growing significantly and confidently before the crisis but like almost every other sector there?s an increasing degree of uncertainty. Professor Osbaldeston feels the international collaboration arrangements with overseas institutions will provide an important cushion for schools such as Cranfield. He goes onto say: ?Criticism about management education isn?t new and the argument that business schools haven?t responded to new challenges is nonsense. We are in the business of education not simply trade schools filling slots.?


Anglia News
TV interview   (15-January-2009)

John Glen was asked to comment on his predictions for the future of businesses in Peterborough, following the closure of Woolworths and MFI.


BBC Radio 2
Radio interview   (14-January-2009)

Stephen Regan was interviewed on the Chris Evans Show discussing the food retailers that are creating jobs despite the tough economic climate.


BBC Radio 5 Live
Radio interview   (8-January-2009)

Today sees the start of the Autosport International Conference in Birmingham (trade show in its 19th year) - will finance be top of the agenda? Professor Mark Jenkins gives his views on the ?Wake up to Money? programme.

Further information...


BBC World Service
Radio interview   (8-January-2009)

Professor Sunil Poshakwale was interviewed in Hindi for his expert comments on Corporate Governance Practices in India following the $1bn accounting scandal in Satyam Computer Services Limited, one of India?s flagship software companies.


The Guardian
Company league tables to reveal male-female pay gap   (6-January-2009)

Companies could be ?named and shamed? in league tables revealing pay inequalities between male and female employees under government plans to tackle the gender pay gap. Men are paid 17.1% more than women for full-time work, according to government figures published in November. Separate research by Cranfield School of Management showed the number of women holding executive directorships in FTSE 100 companies fell in 2007 to the lowest level for nine years. Only three of Britain?s top companies have female chief executives.

Further information...


Financial Times
Time to talk to the taxman   (3-January-2009)

The credit crunch may be hitting small businesses hard, but one unlikely side effect has been welcomed by entrepreneurs - the taxman is getting nicer. A raft of new measures has been introduced by the government as part of its pre-Budget report proposals to extend the existing time to pay (TTP) provision into a recognised business payment support service (BPSS). Gerard Burke, director of the Business Growth and Development Programme says: ?If the government can afford to do things like this where it is improving the cash flow situation for businesses with regards to tax, then I would like to see more done.?

Further information...


BBC World Service
Radio interview   (2-January-2009)

Professor Sunil Poshakwale was interviewed in Hindi on the current economic crisis.



home about mba msc doctorates executive development research information contact us